How to Oil and Condition Wooden Spoons

Last week, for dinner one night, Chris made cheesy stuffed peppers from Blue Apron, the chef-designed meal delivery service we have used for the past two years!, and we were both amazed it was meatless because of how satisfying it was. We get their family plan (they also have a 2-person plan), which is two meals a week for a family of 4, but we always have leftovers for lunch the next day. It allows us to experiment with new, farm-fresh ingredients and recipes. While cooking that night, Chris started oiling his favorite wooden spoon and I brought out my camera to document the simple, but important process for you.

How to Oil and Condition Wooden Spoons | Chris Loves Julia

A good wooden spoon can actually be an heirloom if you buy quality and take care of it—-I would love my grandma’s wooden spoons one day. I feel like they would be seasoned for the past 80 years to taste of fresh basil and marinara. We keep ours going strong by oiling them twice a year and not putting them in the dishwasher. It had been at least 6 months before this particular Italian Olive Wood spoon had been conditioned before he started making dinner that night and you can see how faded the wood is.

How to Oil and Condition Wooden Spoons | Chris Loves Julia

To condition it, we simply put it in a large ziplock bag, and drizzle some butcher block or olive oil over the spoon.

How to Oil and Condition Wooden Spoons | Chris Loves Julia

Seal the bag, and massage it into the wood and let it sit for at least 30 minutes, but the longer the better. Doing this right before bed, so it can soak up oil all night is probably the best.

How to Oil and Condition Wooden Spoons | Chris Loves Julia

While his favorite wooden spoon soaked, he prepped the peppers.

How to Oil and Condition Wooden Spoons | Chris Loves Julia

How to Oil and Condition Wooden Spoons | Chris Loves JuliaHow to Oil and Condition Wooden Spoons | Chris Loves Julia

I also have this theory that sheet pans become better with age, too. I love all the markings of well-cooked meals. After the spoon is done soaking, remove it from the bag and we like to use a denim scrap to massage in and soak up any excess oil.

How to Oil and Condition Wooden Spoons | Chris Loves Julia

And just like that, our spoons are better than new.

How to Oil and Condition Wooden Spoons | Chris Loves Julia

Keeping wooden spoons conditioned or oiled, prevents splitting and encourages them to become seasoned with each use–which really takes a regular wooden spoon to heirloom status.

How to Oil and Condition Wooden Spoons | Chris Loves Julia

How to Oil and Condition Wooden Spoons | Chris Loves Julia

In addition to receiving all the fresh ingredients, in the right proportions, in a refrigerated box on our doorstep (hooray for no grocery shopping!), Blue Apron recipe cards contain so many great tips you can use with future recipes–like, adding water to the bottom of the pan to help the peppers soften with steam as they cook in the oven.

How to Oil and Condition Wooden Spoons | Chris Loves JuliaHow to Oil and Condition Wooden Spoons | Chris Loves Julia

You can find the full recipe for these ridiculously good, meatless cheesy stuffed peppers right here. Yes, we’re that couple that like to sit next to each other in the booth instead of across from one another, when we go out. And it just translates right into dinner at home.

How to Oil and Condition Wooden Spoons | Chris Loves Julia

Have you tried Blue Apron? The first 20 readers will get THREE free meals their first Blue Apron order, just click here. We like that there’s no commitment, so we can skip a week if we’re on vacation or cancel for a month if we’re in heavy renovation project and dinner looks more like a protein bar every night–and then there’s nothing like seeing that box on our doorstep again.

ps. An olive wood spoon at a great price and the butcher block oil we love.

How to Oil and Condition Wooden Spoons | Chris Loves Julia

This post is in partnership with Blue Apron, a long time supporter and sponsor of Chris Loves Julia. 

 



9 Comments

  • Reply August 17, 2016

    allison

    So I inherited (grabbed out of the donation box) several of my Grandmothers wooden utensils (spoons, a couple of grooved paddle things that I use as salad tongs, and a few wooden knives/spreading utensils) after she passed away and we were clearing out her house. I have had them now for 2 years, and have thrown them through the dishwasher and never oiled them. That changed today! You are right: they are heirlooms and I want to save and use them for years! Thanks for the kick in the pants to keep them conditioned and maintain them properly- I really appreciate it!

  • Reply August 11, 2016

    Sarah

    I use cheap mineral oil (heavy USP) from the pharmacy – works great on cutting boards, wooden spoons, and bowls. :)

  • Reply August 11, 2016

    Lindsey

    Hi Julia,

    Thank you for this post! I love the sitting overnight trick, WOW.

    I received a huge wooden Analon spoon from a culinary conference and had NO idea what I was missing before! It does have a big crack (someone left it sit in water, not naming names)–is it still okay to use?

    thanks!

  • Reply August 11, 2016

    Hannah

    I have several wooden spoons that need conditioning, so thanks for the reminder! Also, this is a FAB way to do a sponsored post.

  • Reply August 11, 2016

    Kerry H

    I agree with the other commenters above – one of the best sponsored posts I’ve read! I saw the mention of Blue Apron in the beginning and throughout but wasn’t positive it was a sponsored post until the end haha! And who knew the wooden utensils should be oiled?! Thanks for teaching me something new!

  • Reply August 11, 2016

    Monika

    Thank you for having a pan that looks just like mine–not shiny and perfect! My cookie sheets look as if they’ve been used non-stop for 18 years because that’s how long they HAVE been used, for everything. I’m always frustrated when I see pots and pans on shows and blogs that look perfect. On oiling wooden implements… would you use the same method for big wooden bowls? i just rub them with warm butcher block oil and let them sit overnight, then wipe excess off. If the bowls are really stained I sand them lightly first and then oil them. Seems to work but do you have a better method?

    • Reply August 11, 2016

      Julia

      That’s what we do! With our butcher block cutting boards too. :)

  • Reply August 11, 2016

    Oksana @ FOXYOXIE.com

    I am so sad at just now discovering that wooden spoons have to be oiled?! What in the world?! My mom recently brought me a lovely, engraved wooden spoon from a trip abroad, and I’ve already used it a few times and am noticing how quickly it’s wearing down. Must do this ASAP! Also, I agree with Carol’s sentiment – I’ve read so many Blue Apron-sponsored posts, yet yours is such a breath of fresh air. XO

  • Reply August 11, 2016

    Carol

    I never knew oiling wooden spoons was a thing! Thanks for taking your sponsored posts above the norm – I appreciate it!

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