DIY Faux Soapstone Countertop

We’re diving head first into updating our current kitchen!! After we recently finished the floors, our cabinets are looking more orange than ever and we left a disposable table cloth on our island in place of a countertop. Eeeks. Although we are planning a full kitchen remodel next year (??), painting our cabinets is an easy and cheap way to happily wait out a full-on remodel and we came up with this simple DIY faux soapstone countertop for our island this weekend!

DIY Faux Soapstone Countertops

Ace Hardware is celebrating their 90th anniversary this year, and being part of their blogger panel, they challenged us to do a project with just $90. We’re happy to report, this project came in under the bill!

When we reconfigured our island, we put this piece of cheap leftover 3/4″ plywood on top and covered it with a tablecloth.

DIY Faux Soapstone Countertops

While this cheap plywood served as a great base, it was full of knots and was extremely rough. So the first step was to top it with a cabinet-grade plywood which is a lot smoother and higher quality. We decided to go with 3/4″ again, so the finished countertop would be a beefy (okay, pretty standard) 1 1/2″.

DIY Faux Soapstone Countertops

DIY Faux Soapstone Countertops

To adhere the two pieces together, we used construction adhesive first and then drove 26–1″ screws through the bottom.

DIY Faux Soapstone Countertops

No matter how well you measure and cut, chances are the two pieces won’t be exactly the same size–at least that was the case with us.

DIY Faux Soapstone Countertops

Chris used a manual planer we picked up for $13 at our local Ace to quickly even up the edges of the sheets of plywood so they were flush with one another.

DIY Faux Soapstone Countertops

With the edges flush, we didn’t have to spend too much time sanding but we still decided to do a once over and slightly round the edges, too.

DIY Faux Soapstone Countertops

DIY Faux Soapstone Countertops

A lot of imperfections showed up after the planing and sanding–mostly in the cheaper sheet of plywood–but it was nothing a little wood filler and one more round of sanding couldn’t fix.

DIY Faux Soapstone Countertops

DIY Faux Soapstone Countertops

At this point, we had a smooth 1 1/2″ countertop ready for the faux soapstone treatment using rustoleum chalkboard paint and paste wax. I layered on 4 coats of chalkboard paint with a small foam roller, waiting a few hours in between each coat.

DIY Faux Soapstone Countertops

After the paint set up for 24 hours, we lightly sanded the whole surface with a fine-grit sanding block to keep it nice and smooth. I actually drew some fine lines, a la soapstone, with gray chalk on the surface but as soon as we applied to paste wax to seal the countertop, those lines disappeared. Ha! We’re happy with the results just the same.

DIY Faux Soapstone Countertops

We followed the instructions on the paste wax, and applied the wax in even strokes with a t-shirt cloth with the grain and let it dry into a haze before buffing it out.

DIY Faux Soapstone Countertops

DIY Faux Soapstone Countertops

In the photo above, you can see it buffing to a shine on the left, while the right side is still coated in the wax. We opted to do a second coat of wax, which made it even smoother. We’re really happy with the results:

DIY Faux Soapstone Countertops

The chalkboard paint provides a good varied charcoal black like soapstone for a minute fraction of the price. But more than anything, it’s nice to have a durable work surface finally.

DIY Faux Soapstone Countertops DIY Faux Soapstone Countertops

We can’t wait to start painting cabinets and update those stools and a few other quick-fixes to make this space less of an eyesore–this faux soapstone countertop was the perfect springboard and for less than $90? Icing on the cake.

 

Ace90th copy

We’re excited to be collaborating with Ace Hardware as a part of their Ace Blogger Panel this year. Ace has provided us with compensation and a $90 Ace Hardware Gift Card to complete this project (and celebrate their anniversary!) but all ideas, opinions and sweat are our own. 

29 Comments

  • Reply April 29, 2014

    caroline [the diy nurse]

    I can’t believe you did that for $90. What a great option for something temporary or even something like a vacation home where you dont have a ton to spend. I’m in love with the finished product!

  • Reply April 29, 2014

    Lisa | Truelu.com

    Whoa, first time I’ve seen something like this! Pretty neat. What does the finished product feel like to the touch? Dry? Waxy?

    In any case, very creative work, good job!

    • Reply April 29, 2014

      Julia

      Thanks Lisa! The finished product feels smooth and silky–not waxy at all.

  • Reply April 29, 2014

    Laura C

    What a great idea. It looks really good.

  • Reply April 29, 2014

    Linda @ Mason Jar Crafts Love

    What an amazing idea!!! I had no idea you could create kitchen island top with chalkboard paint and wax. Too cool!

    :) Linda

  • Reply April 29, 2014

    Linda @ it all started witlh paint

    Love it! Such a clever and original idea! Pinning for sure …

    Linda

  • Reply April 29, 2014

    Joan

    This looks really great. I’m not sure if you mentioned it, but is there a reason you chose chalkboard paint instead of a flat black latex?

    • Reply April 29, 2014

      Julia

      Chalkboard paint dries into a slate-like surface unlike latex paint. Also, I originally drew some veins on the counter with chalk before adding the paste wax, but that didn’t work out. We opted for the chalkboard paint mostly for the texture and color.

      • April 29, 2014

        Joan

        Thanks, Julia. Its so interesting to see a use for chalkboard paint that isn’t for a chalkboard.

        I enjoy your blog very much.

  • Reply April 29, 2014

    Jennifer @ Brave New Home

    Looks great! Love the finish.

  • Reply April 29, 2014

    Jennifer R.

    I have never used paste wax before so I don’t fully understand how it works once dry. I am imagining a melted ring where a warm plate sits, or a young child eating crumbs off the counter and coming in contact with dangerous chemicals.

    Is it food safe? Would it be damaged if you placed a warm plate of food on it? Any tips? Thanks!

    • Reply April 29, 2014

      Julia

      Great questions! The paste wax is carnauba wax based which is food safe. As for the warm plate, we’ll have to keep you updated on how it wears. The wax is used as a sealant and is then buffed off, so the counters now don’t feel waxy–just satiny. I’ll definitely do an update post in a couple months for ya!

      • April 29, 2014

        Jennifer R.

        Thanks! I guess in my mind a wax rubbed over top is thick rather than the smooth thin coat you are describing. It looks really great and gives me an idea for our garage workspace.

        I just googled it and the melting point is a very low 140 degrees – so better not sit a cup of coffee on it! Other than that, looks good!

  • Reply April 29, 2014

    Meagan Briggs

    This is cool! Very creative. I’m curious what color you’re wanting to paint your cabinets…

    • Reply April 29, 2014

      Julia

      I am picking up so many swatches this week and hope to post about it next week. I’m torn!

  • Reply April 29, 2014

    Shaina

    Painting plywood does not a countertop make. I hope you are not keeping this around for very long. Hideous.

    • Reply April 29, 2014

      Julia

      While this is a temporary solution for us until we renovate our kitchen, you may be surprised to hear that people actually stain and seal high-quality plywood (like we used here) for countertops. Maybe it isn’t your taste–but hideous? Pretty harsh, don’t you think?

    • Reply August 22, 2014

      APRIL

      I don’t see hideous anywhere in any of the pictures….
      Maybe money is no object to YOU- CONGRATULATIONS !!!
      But to some of us (I’m a farmer) this is a GREAT temporary (or maybe permanent) solution !

      BTW- I made an island countertop for $62 a few years ago, it still looks AMAZING and everyone thinks it’s natural stone…. $ does not a beautiful house make.

  • Reply April 29, 2014

    qs777

    I think it looks great! I wish I had thought of it and am looking forward to seeing how it wears.

    Also, thank you for responding to and calling out “Shaina.” I will assume she is having a bad day; however, I truly believe some people are this way because others don’t challenge them. Good for you! Can’t wait to see what you pick for the cabinets. :)

  • Reply April 29, 2014

    Jenna

    I’m so interested to see how this wears! It’s really pretty and is a great inexpensive upgrade if it wears well! Do you think it will work better than the painted counters in your old house? I followed your lead on that one and did it in our house to cover pink laminate counters. It’s wearing okay… still an upgrade from the pink but it does have a few small chips. I’ve touched up once but it’s kind of a hassle since it has a long dry time and strong smell I probably won’t touch up again. Hopefully we can replace with something more permanent soon, unless this ends up performing amazingly!
    Thanks for always having great tips and fresh ideas!

    • Reply April 29, 2014

      Julia

      We had the same experience there with the painted countertops. We had them for about a year and it was completely worth the $20 it took to paint them, even if they did chip before we put in our black walnut countertops. We consider this an interim upgrade as well, but we’ll keep you posted on how this wears!

  • Reply April 29, 2014

    Kerri @ Building a Charmed Life

    great idea! love the finish the wax leaves.

  • Reply April 29, 2014

    Linzy

    I actually saw this counter top idea in a gorgeous spread in Country Living. Their dining room was the cover of the February 2014 issue:

    http://www.countryliving.com/homes/house-tours/carmella-mccafferty-diy-home-decor?click=main_sr#slide-1

    She made plans for her little place in 2012, and has her own blog. I’m curious if you had seen that one, or another blogger or DIYer, or perhaps you came up with it organically? It seems like a great move for an inexpensive solution. The difference here being that the counter tops in Carmella’s case were not meant to be temporary, it was a necessary budget move, and apparently hers have held up well.

    For the short and sweet of it, Julia did a great feature as well (if you don’t want to paw through a slideshow):

    http://hookedonhouses.net/2014/02/25/learning-to-love-living-with-less-in-a-little-house/#more-60903

    • Reply April 29, 2014

      Julia

      Oh my goodness! I just fell into a link fest! I HAD seen Carmella’s kitchen somewhere recently (pinterest?) but was met with a dead link. Booo. Thank you so much for all of these links. I somehow ended up on a post about the Something’s Gotta Give house and apparently they used the same technique for the countertops in that movie to imitate soapstone (except with MDF). How cool!

  • Reply April 29, 2014

    JS4

    It’s a great temporary solution and it should be fine as long as you aren’t preparing food or eating directly on the surface since Johnson’s paste wax isn’t food grade. Just FYI it does contain Deodorized Naptha (a solvent like mineral spirits linked to central nervous system problems). Maybe even use a placemat for kids? Here’s the rating from the Environmental Working Group if interested:

    http://www.ewg.org/guides/cleaners/3098-SCJohnsonPasteWax

  • […] now after moving the pantry over and reconfiguring the island, DIYing a new countertop, installing new floors, removing the microwave and painting the cabinets we have […]

  • Reply July 23, 2014

    Lea

    If someone really wanted the vein look, I wonder if using some sort of spray fixative over the chalk but before the wax would help? Not the most food safe, but depending on the use of the surface could look pretty cool.

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  • […] In the image above, chalkboard paint and paste wax were used to make soapstone-like counters. You can see more on that transformation here. […]

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